Open Thread

This is a page for your use, to try out html tags and see what they look like, to post new ideas, to pass along interesting information, to suggest future topics for discussion, to reach out and contact me directly, the floor is yours.

w.

 

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252 thoughts on “Open Thread

  1. Hi Willis,

    I’m a crazy Aussie who likes playing with climate data. I’ve found an interesting correlation recently, and I’m happy to share it with you. Send me an email if you want something new to chew on.

    Regards,
    J J

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        • They aren’t “blue flashes of light”. if you freeze the frame you can see –extremely clearly– the streak is a launch FROM the fire upward (and I believe toward the camera) toward the sky. Not uncommon with overheated aerosols.

          In real life I run high energy lasers and this isn’t a laser beam or any directed energy. No laser in the world would can make a curved trail like that, leave a visible ‘smoke’ beam, or be so enormously wide. Anyone claiming these videos as lasers is ignorant (probable) or simply lying. Or lying to take advantage of the ignorant; which seems more probable.

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    • I doubt that people are making crop circles with microwaves or lasers. The burn pattern would be evident, the patterns would be far less regular, and the danger to humans would be great.

      The other stuff is interesting, though.

      Thanks,

      w.

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  2. Willis , Thank’s for not making reference to “Tinfoil Hat” None of the above info is theory, it is real tech and can be carried out as we speak. My question is, is it. Are we being attacked by IS’S, or a satellite group. Back in 83 Reagan made this announcement.

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      • Hi again W,
        The Reagan video is just in reference to how long ago the military has been working on laser tech’s as weapons.
        Willis said,
        “I doubt that people are making crop circles with microwaves or lasers. The burn pattern would be evident, the patterns would be far less regular, and the danger to humans would be great.”

        On page 74 of this PDF Figure 56: Illustration of the HILPB Test Rig, if you were to place a design @ the Beam Trimmer I think you could achieve a pattern in a field of crops. and re the temp’s, on page 106 it gives temperature profiles of around 60 C, which to me would achieve the desired outcome without any burn marks.
        https://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=1575&context=etdarchive

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        • jmorpuss – Please educate yourself a bit more. Pictures can lie as well as words, so look behind the ‘cropped shots’ and animated sales videos being pushed for shock value or conspiracy crap. Lasers in that class (or even remotely near it) can’t fly. I’m sure there will be improvements, but it will be decades before laser weapons can do anything useful except from land or sea-based platforms.

          What you see in the video is just the head of the laser, the tiniest part of the system. Even then it takes many seconds to damage (not destroy) a slow speed, extremely low-flying drone. Plastic quadra-copters may be even more vulnerable. Who knows, but a shotgun would be more effective from what I see.

          Here is the laser itself, A FULL FLATBED TRAILER’S WORTH and that doesn’t include the million watt generator or industrial electric power line connection necessary to power it.

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          • hooodathunkit, It appears your the one that needs some more education, so here you go, start learning. That laser your pictured is so 20th century, now step into the 21st.

            “Inside a cramped laboratory in Shanghai, China, physicist Ruxin Li and colleagues are breaking records with the most powerful pulses of light the world has ever seen. At the heart of their laser, called the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility (SULF), is a single cylinder of titanium-doped sapphire about the width of a Frisbee. After kindling light in the crystal and shunting it through a system of lenses and mirrors, the SULF distills it into pulses of mind-boggling power. In 2016, it achieved an unprecedented 5.3 million billion watts, or petawatts (PW). The lights in Shanghai do not dim each time the laser fires, however. Although the pulses are extraordinarily powerful, they are also infinitesimally brief, lasting less than a trillionth of a second. The researchers are now upgrading their laser and hope to beat their own record by the end of this year with a 10-PW shot, which would pack more than 1000 times the power of all the world’s electrical grids combined.”
            https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/physicists-are-planning-build-lasers-so-powerful-they-could-rip-apart-empty-space

            And then your got this little high powered laser the size of an American penny.

            “An international team of scientists has produced the first high-powered, randomly polarised laser beam with a “Q switch” laser, which typically emits pulses of light so brief that they’re measured in nanoseconds. Lasers are a critical part of modern technology—they’re used in everything from our automobiles to medical equipment to the satellites orbiting Earth. Now, researchers are broadening the potential applications of even smaller and more powerful lasers.”

            Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-scientists-high-power-smaller-laser.html#jCp

            Like

          • Note: ‘Reply’ is disabled for jmorpuss comment below, so this is the reply:

            hooodathunkit, It appears your the one that needs some more education, so here you go, start learning.

            Industrial lasers is what I do for a living, please don’t lecture me about what I live everyday —and as can be shown— know full well and will prove.

            That laser your pictured is so 20th century, now step into the 21st.

            No, that is the picture that you posted. Your’s was a ‘cropped shot’ of the discharge head trying to make it look small and capable of being airborne; I posted a photo of the complete laser on the flatbed trailer bed to show its true size.

            Inside a cramped laboratory in Shanghai, China, physicist Ruxin Li and colleagues are breaking records with the most powerful pulses of light the world has ever seen.

            1) Again, size is the problem. The actual laser takes up two large buildings, NOT including the power supplies and conditioning. The Shanghai folks have a nice easy to understand presentation about the laser, and the buildings’ layouts are on page 16 of this PDF. It will not fit on any aircraft ever built.

            2) The lasers aren’t actually powerful, they are trading off lower continuous power by ‘spiking it’ or time-compression into tiny pulses. They are gaming the definition of power (the watt) which is 1 joule per second. Your own cite shows a single pulse, peak power of ~1,400 watts for 25 nanoseconds. 1.4kW is a very low power industrial laser, suitable for cutting plastic film or cloth. I operate lasers of the exact same NdYAG type, and it would take about 1/4 second for a 1.4kW continuous laser to pierce a piece of paper; 10 million of these ‘powerful’ pulses.

            But because the pulse is so short it’s rated by ‘what it would have been IF it lasted for one whole second’, which means the power is multiplied by 40 million as if it lasted one second. That makes the ‘rated output’ of this laser ~56GW (56 billion watts) when in reality it put a hole in a piece of paper. LOL The Shanghai laser has attained even shorter pulses about 20 femtoseconds, so it’s actual peak power is multiplied by 50,000,000,000,000 to get the headline of “5.3 million billion watts” when the peak power is actually about that of a 100 watt light bulb. The power rating is a shorthand for the pulse length (not so much the power) and as the name Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility implies, the main goal is incredibly tiny pulses.
            ___
            All this is based on direct cites by jmorpuss who has implied these enormous buildings are orbiting above California to ‘laser blast’ people’s houses or make crop circles. IMO you’re falling for sensationalist clickbait because you don’t understand the technology behind it.

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          • hooodathunkit, Thanks for your comment below, This section isn’t really for this type of discussion. BUT I will provide another TIP. The blue laser at end of clip is only 5 watts and hand held, with a focusing lens for distance.

            And if Willis see fit to open up a thread on the topic, I would love to go into it further.

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          • Hoodathunkit, thanks for your clear exposition showing the gaping holes in jmorpuss’s theories about lasers making crop circles and the like.

            jmorpuss, truly, you need to turn up the sensitivity on your skepticism meter. If something seems too good to be true … it is.

            w.

            Like

  3. Hi Willis, What’s your thoughts on putting this together ?

    “GUANGZHOU, China — A crisis over a mysterious ailment sickening American diplomats and their families — which began in Cuba and recently appeared in China — has widened as the State Department evacuated at least two more Americans from China on Wednesday.”

    “During the Cold War, the Russian Embassy
    microwaved the United States Embassy in
    Moscow with low-level microwaves for many year
    s from across the road; why and how is outside
    the scope of this Declaration. After changes
    of staff for serious neurological impairments,
    miscarriages, multiple cancers / leukemia and other illnesses to both male and female
    employees and their children, the late John R. Goldsmith, M.D., was invited to investigate this matter. His investigative report
    on this incident showed that continuous, long-term low-level
    microwaves were responsible for those illnesses. Goldsmith, J. R.,
    Radio frequency Epidemiology
    Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol 105, at 1585, Supp 6,
    Table 8, Dec (1997). Dr. Goldsmith
    held 11 Professorships and was the
    World Health Organization (WHO) representative for Europe. Interestingly, the power of the microwaves used by the Russians in some cases was less that the power used by modern-day transmitters ”

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  4. Hi Willis, I see your haven’t left any comments for the video above, so I thought this may encourage a response.
    Hundreds of Birds Fall From the Sky During 5G Test in The Netherlands.

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    • jmorpuss, when I see something like that I look for some reputable media outlet telling the story. I looked and looked, and all I found were sites called things like “consciouslifenews” and “dcclothesline” and “gumshoenews” and the like, with headlines saying things like “New 5G WIFI Coming And It Will KILL US All” and “How 5G Will Kill the Birds, Bees, and Your Loved Ones” …

      Pass … all of them are just repeating the same story, no further news, nothing solid at all.

      I have enough of a struggle fighting real science. I don’t have time for stuff out on the fringes. If it is real it will make it to the center. Until then, I’ll let people on the fringes discuss the stuff on the fringes.

      Best regards to you and yours,

      w.

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      • Willis,
        A couple of old sayings sprang to mind as I was reading your reply.
        1. You can’t teach a old dog new tricks, and
        2. You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink.
        Anyway, I won’t bother you anymore with stuff you don’t believe in, It only wastes my time, I will leave you with these couple of videos. Because “pictures paint a thousand words”


        Cheers and stay well.

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        • Bro’, comparing me to an old dog who can’t learn anything new? You can stuff that excrement where the sun don’t shine.

          I learn new things every day. When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do? But I don’t believe every new claim that comes past my face. I do what I did with your claim about the dead birds. I look for corroborating evidence.

          I found none, so I let it go … and you want to insult me over that?? Sorry, but that dog won’t hunt.

          w.

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    • jmorpuss, you claimed that birds were being killed by 5G microwaves. I said that’s fringe. In response you send me an article on where birds go when they die … an article which says, in its entirety:

      ===
      “It’s rare to see a dead bird on the ground, but it is also rare to see a dead mouse or rat – which are generally much more numerous. We don’t question this because we don’t see rodents much when they are alive – they are secretive and nocturnal.

      It’s only because living birds are so conspicuous that it seems strange not to see them when dead. Birds don’t usually drop dead in mid-flight – they die in their nest or are caught and eaten, much like other small animals.”
      ===

      I have no clue what that has to do with anecdotal reports of bird deaths from 5G … all of which seem to be feeding off of each other, none of which seem to have checkable facts, and all of which are reported in fringe websites.

      w.

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  5. Here’s a tip for you, Willis: Have a happy, healthy, prosperous New year, you and all your loved ones, in-laws, and outlaws.

    (Same tip applies to all the denizens here. 😁)

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  6. Today’s Chronicle: Latinos account for nearly half of 172 people killed by police in California in 2017. Any comments on the report?

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  7. Good day from England, Willis! I don’t know if you have watched or heard any of Scott Adams’ recent discussions on the climate change debate, but I would suggest that there is a golden opportunity there for someone like you to open a dialogue with him. He does a good job of questioning the assumptions and evidence both sides present, and attempts to comment honestly on the persuasiveness of each side’s current arguments. His daily podcast is available on Periscope and YouTube, and directly from his Twitter account.

    In my experience, you do an impressive job of providing clear, concise reasoning and avoiding personal attacks and obfuscation in your writing. I suggest that it would be ideal to provide Scott with a succinct ‘Top 5 best arguments for skepticism about catastrophic climate change’. A series of ‘elevator pitches’ may be helpful. Scott has already identified problems with the reliability and alteration of historical temperature data (especially as highlighted by Tony Heller), but does not yet seem to have discovered compelling arguments against the ‘worrying’ rate of recent temperature change as put forward by the alarmist camp.

    Thanks for many an hour of reading pleasure!

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    • Phil, you are more than welcome. I’ve thought about writing to Scott Adams, but I’m a heretic, not a skeptic, so explaining my position takes time. Worth more thought, though.

      Welcome to the blog,

      w.

      Like

  8. I recently read an article at wattsupwiththat.com that you wrote about a study from Rice University That article sent my mind to wondering about the wind generation in Texas. Here in Texas we have more wind generators than any other state (I read that 2 or 3 years ago so it might be dated). We also have our own electric grid that is more or less isolated from the rest of the nation. To find out the state of wind generation in Texas, I went to ercot.com and downloaded the 2017 data for the grid. This is the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas web site.

    What I found was interesting and I believe it could make a good follow on article. Here are the factoids that prove wind generated electricity will NEVER run any grid.

    • Texas had over 21,000 MW of name plate capacity wind generators installed at the end of 2017
    • Texas grid in 2017 had a high load of 69,599 MW and a low load of 25,476 MW
    • Non AC/heating load is about 33,000 MW during the day (not really relevant but interesting)
    • The ERCOT data is a snapshot of grid load once an hour 24/7. There were 43 points recorded in 2017 where the wind generation was <1% of the total load.

    As a good approximation of cost of wind generators is $1M per MW. That would mean that over the past 20 years there has been over $20Billon spent on wind generators in Texas. Now think about this… they could have spent 100 times that much and still not covered the load 24/7. Try saying that out loud.

    Two Trillion dollars won’t buy enough wind generators to power Texas.

    While I’m technical writer and my readers are always forced to read the stuff that I write, I feel that this information needs to be put in front of people in a way that most can understand. I don’t have that ability. I hope that you might.

    If you need any other information let me know.

    Russell Duke
    Operations Manager
    EnergyClean by MTI Services, LLC.
    832-523-1610

    Like

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